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Blog Archives

Ahead of World Water Day, Dow, Richard Childress Racing and University Research Partners Spotlight Importance of Innovation and Collaboration in Arizona

2017.03.20-NewsFeed-Dow WWD-IMAGEIn the race to secure a sustainable water future, leaders from The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: Dow), NASCAR, Richard Childress Racing (RCR), the University of Arizona and Pima County Wastewater Reclamation met in Tucson to discuss local water challenges and solutions to effectively address water scarcity.

Coinciding with World Water Day, which takes place March 22, the event brought together industry, business, government and academic representatives to explore how alliances and collaborations can further advance technology, processes and strategies that conserve, reclaim and renew resources. Attendees toured the University of Arizona’s Water and Energy Sustainable Technology (WEST) Center after hearing speeches by prominent national and local figures. They then met with researchers, professors and graduate students in a range of interactive research, analytic, character, sensory and wet labs.

“Innovation and collaboration are key to finding sustainable paths forward for society,” remarked Neil Hawkins, corporate vice president and chief sustainability officer at Dow. “Water in the Southwest is a great example of a significant challenge, but one where win-win-win solutions are possible if all the right stakeholders come together with a commitment to collaboration. Dow is pleased to work with University of Arizona, local leaders, and the NASCAR team to help deliver a more sustainable society.”

Austin Dillon, 2-time NASCAR champion, welcomed the crowd with an invigorating speech on water conservation. As an avid sportsman and outdoorsman, Dillon stressed the importance of water resources to individuals and communities alike –whether it be used to light up our cities, manufacture automobiles, and power our own bodies. He then unveiled the No. 3 Dow Chevrolet’s new World Water Day paint scheme. The car will compete in the Camping World 500 in Phoenix on March 19.

“I have always loved fishing, boating and being outdoors near the water,” said Dillon. “World Water Day reminds us that we need to do our part to conserve and recycle resources so that everyone can enjoy it.”

Providing the foundation for the event, the WEST Center brings together diverse groups to address the nation’s growing water and energy needs through research and technology. Dr. Kimberly Espy, senior vice president for research at the University of Arizona noted, “Since its inception, the WEST Center has been a hub for expert researchers across academia, government, and industry to collaboratively address a diverse set of grand challenges in sustainability. Through synergies with world-class companies, such as Dow, we’re able to tackle the water challenges in arid environments like our own Sonoran Desert and beyond.”

Read the full release here.

Sports Facilities, Water And Energy Opportunities

Facility Executive

2017.02.07-NewsFeed-DOE NIBS Report-IMAGE

It might not seem like installing a low-flush toilet would have much impact on the daily water use of a family of four, but think what a difference it could make at one football stadium on Super Bowl Sunday. Consider the NRG Stadium in Houston, TX, the location the championship match up between New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons earlier this month. That stadium facility has a seating capacity of 71,795, not including the thousands of vendors, security personnel, and half-time participants, not to mention the teams themselves. Now, think about the impact that low-flush toilet could have.

A new report released by the National Institute of Building Sciences and the Green Sports Alliance looks at ways sports venues throughout the U.S. can make an impact by reducing their energy and water use. The report, “Taking the Field: Advancing Energy and Water Efficiency in Sports Venues”, considers the potential water and energy reductions the U.S. sports sector could make, and highlights the financial savings some leagues and teams are already seeing from putting such efficiency initiatives into place.

Read the full story here.

New Report Looks at Energy and Water Performance of Sports Venues

2017.02.07-NewsFeed-DOE NIBS Report-IMAGE

It might not seem like installing a low-flush toilet would have much impact on the daily water use of a family of four, but think what a difference it could make at one football stadium on Super Bowl Sunday. Consider the NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, the location of this week’s game between the New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons. It has a seating capacity of 71,795, not including the thousands of vendors, security personnel and half-time participants, not to mention the teams themselves. Now, think about the impact that low-flush toilet could have.

A new report released today by the National Institute of Building Sciences and the Green Sports Alliance looks at ways the nation’s sports venues can make an impact by reducing their energy and water use. The report, Taking the Field: Advancing Energy and Water Efficiency in Sports Venues, considers the potential water and energy reductions the U.S. sports sector could make, and highlights the financial savings some leagues and teams are already seeing from putting such efficiency initiatives into place. The two organizations released the report during the 43rd Annual Stadium Managers Association Seminar, being held February 5 – 9, 2017, in Huntington Beach, California.

“Nothing captures the attention of Americans quite like sports,” said National Institute of Building Sciences President Henry L. Green, Hon. AIA. “When stadiums and arenas—some of the largest buildings in the nation—set high-performance building goals, it is something everyone can cheer for. We thank representatives from across the sports industry for contributing to this research, and look forward to seeing sports venues take steps to improve their energy and water efficiency.”

Over 240 million fans visit sports venues annually. Total square footage of these facilities easily reaches into the hundreds of millions. Sports teams and clubs employ nearly 60,000 people and generate $22.6 billion in annual revenue. The opportunity for these facility owners to improve energy and water performance of their venues, reduce operating costs and engage their communities is enormous.

“This report is a valuable resource for advancing energy and water performance across the sports industry and further making the business case for sustainability,” said Justin Zeulner, Green Sports Alliance executive director. “Our sports members will benefit from the continued sharing of innovative solutions that emphasize the importance of measuring and tracking energy and water use at sports venues. When we all PLAY GREENER, we all win.”

Read the full press release here.

Click here to view the report.

MEMBERS INCLUDE...
382
TOTAL MEMBERS
180
TEAMS
187
VENUES
15
LEAGUES