test
Blog Archives

NFL, PepsiCo And U.S. Bank Stadium Partners Including Aramark, SMG And The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Team Up To Score First Zero Waste Legacy Project At Super Bowl LII

Aramark

“Rush2Recycle” Will Intercept Waste at U.S. Bank Stadium, Home of the Minnesota Vikings

Image Courtesy of Rush2Recycle.com

Image Courtesy of Rush2Recycle.com

Project Aims to Set New Standard for Recycling and Waste Management at Future Large-Scale Events

The NFL, in partnership with PepsiCo, Aramark, U.S. Bank Stadium and the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, today announced Rush2Recycle, a game plan to recover more than 90% – more than 40 tons – of stadium waste at Super Bowl LII on Sunday, Feb. 4. After months of preparation to eradicate trash materials from the stadium, the 90%+ gameday goal will maximize recycling and composting. This zero waste effort aims to leave a positive green legacy at U.S. Bank Stadium and in the Super Bowl host city, and create a playbook for other leagues, teams, site operators and fans to intercept waste in their communities.

On gameday, every chef, custodian and fan will be part of the team working to recover at least 90% of stadium waste by recycling bottles and cans, composting organic materials like food waste and service ware, and repurposing items like discarded handbags, signage and construction materials through local community organizations. Rush2Recyle staff will encourage stadium fans to recycle and compost. Through this process, stadium partners introduced a tri-bin waste collection system, invested in a dedicated organics compactor and implemented a detailed post-game waste sort to insure each waste stream is contaminant-free. This work will leave a lasting impact after the final whistle, as the stadium’s waste diversion infrastructure will be permanent installations at U.S. Bank Stadium, helping protect the environment and reduce waste hauling costs.

“The NFL is a responsible steward of the environment in all areas of our business,” said NFL Commissioner ROGER GOODELL. “For 25 years, the NFL has strived to reduce the environmental impact of its events and leave a positive green legacy in host communities. Through this project, the League and its partners hope to set a new standard of environmental sustainability at the Super Bowl.”

The effort will also engage fans nationwide, inviting them to join the Rush2Recycle team and providing tips to recycle more and intercept waste at Super Bowl parties and year-round. PepsiCo and the Rush2Recycle ambassador – Super Bowl XL MVP and Pittsburgh Steelers Legend HINES WARD – are launching a social media campaign to showcase recycling MVPs across the country, and inspire fans to tackle waste in their communities. Ward will be sharing his own recycling end zone dance, the Rush2Recyle Shuffle, which will be made available at www.Rush2Recycle.com, along with tips and other resources.

Read the full story.

USC Wins Pac-12 Zero Waste Competition

Daily Trojan
By 

USC Coliseum

The Pac-12 Conference office announced Wednesday that USC was selected as the overall winner of the 2017 Football Zero Waste Competition.

For the competition, every Pac-12 university took part in diverting the most waste from the landfill at a predetermined football and men’s basketball game during the Fall 2017 season.

Sustainability advocates Bill Walton, Graham Oberly and Mike Carey selected the winners for the categories. Each school was evaluated on a summary scorecard detailing its efforts during the Zero Waste game.

Last October’s USC vs. Utah game was selected for evaluation. With a 90.96 percent gameday waste diversion rate, USC won first place.

Aside from choosing the overall winner, Pac-12 determined which institution utilized the most innovative methods to expand sustainability education efforts. Three other universities were also selected as winners for three subcategories, including fan engagement, most improved and student-athlete engagement.

During the Utah game, attendees were invited to engage in an interactive tailgate, giveaways, flash mobs, a live trumpet brigade and confetti cannons.

Recycle Man, a mascot who sported a green mask and an outfit bearing the recycling symbol, encouraged fans to partake in a bean bag toss. The toss had the attendees sort food waste and recyclables into the proper bins and educated attendees on sustainable habits.

Read the full story.

The Surprising Way This Major Surfing Competition Is Making Composting Mainstream

Rodales Organic Life

Christine Yu

Sports events are starting to play a huge role in keeping the planet healthy.

Photo Credit: World Surf Leagues

Photo Credit: World Surf Leagues

Along the side of the dirt road at Waihuena Farms, this small-scale organic farm on the North Shore of Oahu is making what one of its farmers calls, “boutique, artisan compost.” Using a Japanese composting technique called bokashi, staff and volunteers mix food waste with a brew of microorganisms, pickling the food and creating a potent fertilizer that feeds the farm’s plant beds.

But the organic waste isn’t just scraps from the farm and landscapers around the island. In November and December, over 3,000 pounds comes from the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, a premier three-event series of professional surf competitions that draws tens of thousands of people to the North Shore every year. The City and County lifeguards of Honolulu estimate that on competition days, an average of 25,000 people can pack the beach to watch the world’s best surfers in action.

However, the increase in visitors also brings a surge in trash, putting a strain on the island’s waste management system and natural resources.

Waihuena Farms is part of a unique partnership between Vans and Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, a local grassroots nonprofit organization, to decrease the impact of the Triple Crown on the island state and the environment. “Our goal is always to leave no footprint behind,” says Kim Matsoukas, Senior Manager for Sustainability and Social Responsibility for Vans.

Through a full-scale waste management system, they divert approximately 65 percent of overall waste from the Triple Crown away from landfills and incinerators a year, an increase from 29 percent in 2013.

During the competition period, Sustainable Coastlines sets up bins on the beach and regularly sorts and empties the trash. To encourage people to sort their trash into the proper waste stream, the bins are clearly labeled—recycle, compost, and trash. All approved caterers and food vendors don’t sell single-use plastic bottles and are required to use compostable plates and utensils.

 Then, the utensils, napkins, food containers, and food waste are collected and taken to Waihuena Farms, chipped down, and added to the compost piles and into the garden. “This is where Ke Nui Kitchen sources a lot of their food, which they then feed back to the competitors at the Vans Triple Crown,” says Kahi Pacarro, Executive Director of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii. Even the cardboard from the events are used as weed mats on the farm to kill weeds and prep the soil for planting. Plus, since there are no commercial composting facilities on Oahu, the partnership helps return some of the natural resources back to the island.
SPORTS MEMBERS INCLUDE...
396
TOTAL SPORTS MEMBERS
188
TEAMS
193
VENUES
15
LEAGUES