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Waste Management, the Boston Red Sox and Aramark Celebrate Earth Day with Successful Post-Game Waste Sorting Event at Fenway Park

2017.04.21-NewsFeed-WM & Fenway Earth Day-IMAGE

Waste Management (NYSE: WM), in partnership with the Boston Red Sox and Aramark, celebrated Earth Day 2017 a bit early with a post-game waste sort event at Fenway Park in Boston on Monday afternoon. The event followed the Red Sox’ traditional Patriots Day – Marathon Monday morning game vs. the Tampa Bay Rays. Volunteers joined employees of the three organizations along with Major League Baseball’s facility operations senior coordinator, Jason Kobeda, and the City of Boston’s recycling policy director, Susan Casino in sorting trash inside Fenway Park immediately following the game.

A typical game day at Fenway generates more than seven tons of trash, and Monday’s game was no exception. Monday’s waste sorting effort resulted in the collection of 2,178 pounds of recyclables and 221 pounds of organics from trash –which might have otherwise wound up in a Massachusetts landfill.

“Sorting the volume of waste generated by 40,000+ fans requires teamwork, and our volunteer crew was exceptional,” said Michelle Lee Guiney of Waste Management. “With multiple post-game events going on around us, including a party for 10,000 marathon runners, they worked diligently to gather and sort materials under challenging circumstances. We sincerely appreciate their flexibility, good humor and generosity!”

In the spirit of the event, volunteers received upcycled tee-shirts from The Red Sox Team Store, which are new, but obsolete Red Sox tees turned inside-out and specially branded for the event.  Through upcycling, each repurposed cotton tee-shirt conserves 700 gallons of water, and prevents the emission of carbon dioxide and the application of pesticides needed to grow cotton for new shirts. Volunteers also brought their own reusable water bottles.

Fenway Park provides ample recycling and composting bins, but a lot of items that could be sorted are often thrown into regular trash bins. Waste-sorting events such as this showcase the positive environmental impact of taking a few extra seconds to self-sort cups, trays, wrappers, food, and other items. “Recovering discarded items makes a tremendous difference in diverting waste from our landfills, significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” said Guiney.

“The waste sorting event is a great showcase of the commitment by the Red Sox to promoting sustainable practices throughout the season at Fenway Park,” said Paul Hanlon, senior director, ballpark operations & sustainability, Major League Baseball. “Pursuing a zero waste event is no easy task and we applaud the Red Sox ownership, the entire organization and their partners for their hard work and environmental leadership in this endeavor.”

The Boston Red Sox organization is a leader in sustainability initiatives, and was named the Bay State’s 2016 Recycler of the Year by MassRecycle. Waste Management’s “Total Recycling Program” and Aramark Corporation are integral partners in Fenway Park’s award-winning materials management (sorting, recycling, composting) programs.

PHOTO: Waste Management, the Boston Red Sox and Aramark, celebrated Earth Day 2017 a bit early with a post-game waste sort event at Fenway Park in Boston on Monday afternoon following the Red Sox’ traditional Patriots Day morning game. Volunteers sorted trash inside Fenway Park immediately following the game, and collected 2,178 pounds of recyclables and 221 pounds of organics from trash, which might have otherwise wound up in a Massachusetts landfill.  A typical game day at Fenway generates more than seven tons of trash. Shown in the photo – front row (L-R): Scott Peters, WM; Michael Long, volunteer; Michelle Lee Guiney, WM; Sherri Gonzalez, WM; Susan Casino, volunteer; Lee Casino, volunteer; Robyn Pacini, Boston Red Sox. Back row(L-R): Matthew Guiney, volunteer; James McFarlane, WM; Tim Morin, WM; Jason Kobeda, Major League Baseball; Jonathan Lister, Boston Red Sox.

University of Wyoming ‘Waste-Less’ Basketball Game Nets 266 Pounds of Recyclables

UW students and staff members celebrate the Feb. 25 waste-less basketball game in front of their “Mount Trashmore” piles (recycling left, landfill right) to demonstrate how much waste volunteers diverted. (Betsy Trana Photo)

UW students and staff members celebrate the Feb. 25 waste-less basketball game in front of their “Mount Trashmore” piles (recycling left, landfill right) to demonstrate how much waste volunteers diverted. (Betsy Trana Photo)

The University of Wyoming Department of Athletics and the Campus Sustainability Committee scored a victory of their own at the UW men’s basketball game against New Mexico Feb. 25: a successful “waste-less” athletic event and launch of the Conservation Cowboys initiative.

The Conservation Cowboys initiative aims to reduce waste and resource use at athletics facilities and events.

“Trash Talkers” — student, staff and faculty volunteers — helped fans sort recyclables from waste materials inside the Arena-Auditorium. Their efforts resulted in the diversion of 266 pounds of the total 659 pounds of waste materials from the landfill — a 40 percent diversion rate.

A total of 35 volunteers from eight student organizations and four operational and academic units participated in the waste-less event. The Sustainability Club, the Student Dietetics Association, ACRES Student Farm and the Energy Resources Club rallied the most student volunteers. Each student group received a stipend for its efforts, thanks to a grant from Rocky Mountain Power, which additionally provided game-day support for volunteers.

“The game is just the latest demonstration of student enthusiasm for waste reduction efforts across the UW campus since the Sustainability Club and Sustainability Coalition piloted zero-waste event guidelines at the 2016 Shepard Symposium,” says Meghann Cranford, Campus Sustainability Committee student communications intern. “Student group collaboration will be essential for the ongoing Conservation Cowboys effort.”

The pilot game allowed the Campus Sustainability Committee to identify areas for improvement in the future, including when and where to place volunteers; the need for permanent and uniform recycling bins and signs; and the exploration of large-scale composting to allow diversion of food waste and concessions to-go items from the landfill.

“Just as a team never celebrates one win for too long, the Conservation Cowboys are already looking ahead to see how they can use what they learned from this game to spearhead a waste-less football game in the fall,” Cranford says.

Read the full story here.

A Play-By-Play of Super Bowl LI’s Waste Diversion Efforts

By Mallory Szczepanski

2017.02.22-NewsFeed-Super Bowl Waste-IMAGE

Millions of sports fans (and entertainment fans) tuned in to watch Super Bowl LI yesterday, which concluded with the New England Patriots victory over the Atlanta Falcons in a first-ever Super Bowl overtime. And while those fans were busy munching on tasty snacks, drinking refreshing beverages, cheering on their team and catching up with friends and family, the NFL and the staff at NRG Stadium in Houston were working to divert as much waste from landfill as possible.

In preparation for the big game, approximately 150 new recycling bins were placed throughout NRG Stadium, and about a dozen local agencies were recruited by the Houston Food Bank to help capture unserved, surplus food from the stadium.

Additionally, NRG Energy Inc. and its subsidiary Reliant partnered with the NFL to provide 100 percent Green-e certified renewable energy to NRG Stadium for a certain time period before, during and after the big game.

“As the official electricity company of NRG Stadium, we are proud to support the NFL and Houston by powering the largest U.S. sporting event with renewable energy certificates together with the onsite efficiency and renewable energy solutions,” said NRG Vice President of Sustainability Bruno Sarda in a statement. “At NRG, we want fans to benefit from sustainable solutions and together with the NFL, we can demonstrate that even a huge event like the Super Bowl can significantly reduce its energy usage.”

These sustainable efforts by NRG and its partners go hand-in-hand with its everyday goals to divert more material from landfill and to make its venues more sustainable.

Read the full story here.

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