test
Blog Archives

Grass Not the Only Thing Green in Modern Stadiums

ProudGreenBuilding
By Dawn Yankeelov

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in Atlanta, will be able to prevent 680,000 gallons of untreated rainfall to reach the sewers. Credit: istockphoto.com/MarilynNieves

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium, in Atlanta, will be able to prevent 680,000 gallons of untreated rainfall to reach the sewers. Credit: istockphoto.com/MarilynNieves

Hot summer days lead us into stadiums that showcase some of the most important building construction leaps forward in recent years, from green construction practices to energy-efficiency, and now a test bed for solar technologies.

The Green Sports Alliance just announced a partnership to synthesize and review the “green data in June 2018 with Measurabl, the world’s most widely adopted sustainability software for the built environment. More than 5.5 billion square feet of commercial property valued in excess of $1.5 trillion in 70 countries use their software to manage, benchmark and report sustainability performance.

The sports culture has embraced sustainability and green construction for more than a decade and made a big splash in revealing their practices visible to spectators. More than 73 million fans turn out to stadiums each year, moving in environments noted for their sophistication in water management, heating and cooling technologies, modular construction and even solar photovoltaics.

The U.S. Department of Energy, working with the National Institute of Building Sciences, funded a 2017 66-page report – Taking the Field –on stadiums. Green building rating programs, such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), allow owners, operators and designers to think holistically about implementing sustainable design and operations practices. To date, 80 venues have comported to a LEED standard, according to the report. Key agencies in the federal government that have engaged the sports communities and stadiums include the U.S. Department of Energy, the State Department and the EPA.

Read the full story here.

Stadiums Aim for Greener Architecture

By 

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. It is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs.

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. It is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs.

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs. The final phase of the construction of its roof started this past week. The stadium, located in the home of the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL), and the Atlanta United FC of the Major League Soccer (MLS), holds the record of the world’s largest halo board.

The unique roof, once completed, will give officials the option to open and close the roof in as quickly as 12 minutes. During this final phase, construction activities will require the roof to be open in a locked position for 10 days to complete elements of the automation process.

The nine-month-old, $1.6-billion stadium has a 20-foot-high gray concrete box underneath an overpass that can hold up to 680,000 gallons of rainwater, collected mostly from the roof of the enormous stadium. The cistern is one of the environmental centerpieces of the building. It is used to irrigate the vegetation around the building, and by storing much of it, flooding will be reduced in the nearby neighborhood. In other words, the 120-foot-long cistern saves money and helps the surrounding area.

The United States Green Building Council, which grades sustainable design and energy efficiency, has bestowed the stadium with the leadership in energy and environmental design (LEED) platinum certification — the first stadium to win it. The agency gives points to builders based on features like efficient lighting, air-conditioning and water fixtures. Builders also earn points for locating their structures near public transportation, and for using locally-sourced and recycled materials.

The stadium secured 88 of a potential 110 points, more than enough to receive the top LEED ranking. It’s no surprise that sports arenas and stadiums have a far smaller carbon footprint than many factories, shopping malls, or office buildings. Even though they host thousands of people for big events, most days, they are used for short durations. And in recent years, these centres have become showcases for green design.

Though critics may argue that leagues are wrapping themselves in eco-friendly banners to help market their sports, team owners have learned that environmentally-friendly arenas are cheaper to operate.

Read the full article here.

Hockey in the Desert

By John Schwartz, New York Times

Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Monday in Las Vegas. The outside temperature before the game was in the 90s Fahrenheit. Credit: Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Monday in Las Vegas. The outside temperature before the game was in the 90s Fahrenheit.
Credit: Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

My paradox meter just broke.

Back in February we reported on how global warming was messing up the outdoor skating season in Canada and the northern United States. Now, the Stanley Cup finals are being played in Las Vegas, one of America’s hottest cities.

Doesn’t that mean that hockey is contributing to climate change — and maybe its own demise — by building ice palaces in the desert?

Before you give Las Vegas and the National Hockey League too much side eye, it’s worth noting that the league has been working to address environmental issues, including climate change. It has an ongoing sustainability initiative aimed at minimizing the sport’s damage to the environment, and that initiative includes T-Mobile Arena, home of the Vegas Golden Knights. The city’s leaders, furthermore, have made progress in running the municipal government on renewable energy.

Still. That ice. In the desert. It’s not cheap to make or easy to maintain.

Read the full article here.

Welcome to the Green Sports Alliance News Feed & Blog. We do our best to keep up with new and noteworthy stories in the world of green sports, but if we've missed something, please drop us a line and let us know! Use the search function below or click through our archive to find past postings.
SPORTS MEMBERS INCLUDE...
404
TOTAL SPORTS MEMBERS
194
TEAMS
194
VENUES
16
LEAGUES