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Blog Archives

It’s Overtime for Climate Change and Everyone Needs to Score

SportsBusiness Journal
By Vivek Ranadivé

As the heart of civic life, sports teams have a unique opportunity to be a leader in the environmental change movement. The greatest civilizations in the world have centered around large gathering places where people come together to talk, interact, enjoy sports and entertainment, and even engage in political debate. Today, sports venues are no different — they serve as the 21st century communal fireplace.

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When we set out to build the new Sacramento Kings arena in downtown Sacramento, we asked more than 20,000 Sacramentans what they wanted to achieve in their new arena, Golden 1 Center. Across the board the answer was: “To become a model of sustainability.”

And that is what we built. Our new arena achieves the highest sustainability standards, becoming the world’s only 100 percent solar-powered and LEED platinum-certified arena — putting it in the top 3 percent of all buildings scored by the organization.

By moving our arena downtown, we are reducing average miles traveled per attendee by 20 percent, cutting overall air emissions by 24 percent, and by 2020, will have reduced travel-related greenhouse gas emissions per attendee by 36 percent.

As the first-ever indoor/outdoor arena in the world, we’re able to take advantage of the region’s natural cooling phenomenon — The Delta Breeze — to control the building’s climate efficiently.

We built seven green outdoor walls totaling 4,800 square feet — covering two-thirds of the arena — as a living symbol of sustainability, installed low-flow plumbing fixtures throughout the arena, which can save over 40 percent of a typical arena’s water consumption, and ensured 99 percent of our demolition materials from the construction of the arena — over 101,000 tons — were recycled and diverted from landfills.

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Green Innovation In Sport: How Future Stadiums Will Look

Huffington Post UK
By Robert Bright

Amsterdam Arena

Amsterdam Arena

Nothing can compete with the atmosphere of a packed sports stadium. We go in our millions every week to arenas around the world where we cheer on our team, or maybe sing-a-long to our favourite band. But while there might be plenty of energy coming from the fans, the stadium itself tends to consume it at huge rates.

To give you some idea, the electricity used by Wembley Stadium’s floodlights for one match in London is equivalent to watching 20,936 football matches on TV at home. Then there’s the waste to think about, with anywhere in the region of 10-15 tonnes of rubbish produced per game in most stadiums. And that’s before we get into the size and impact of the structure itself, the materials used in its construction, and the means by which people get to and from the venue.

Stadiums and the smart city

For some years now, architects, designers, engineers and ecologists have been radically rethinking the stadium to bring it in line with environmental recommendations and our changing attitudes towards the planet. What’s more, stadiums are central to the concept of the smart city.

In environments where Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will increasingly play a part, stadiums will become providers as well as consumers, proxy power plants, storing and transferring energy that will be used elsewhere. This is a trend we’re already seeing in other large structures, like the PricewaterhouseCoopers building in London and the Bank of America tower in New York.

One of the biggest innovations and best examples of a stadium integrating into the smart city concept is the world-famous Amsterdam ArenA (pictured above), home to the legendary Netherlands side, Ajax. Nissan, power management company Eaton and The Mobility House have developed an energy storage system that makes the energy management of the Amsterdam ArenA more efficient, sustainable and reliable.

It makes use of repurposed batteries from Nissan’s EV car, the LEAF – 280 of them in total. These batteries are used for back up power but will ultimately replace the stadiums diesel generators, providing four Megawatts of power and four Megawatts of storage capacity. The technology to operate the system in this complex setup was developed by The Mobility House.

Read the full story here.

Bright Outlook: Martinsville Fires Up New Lighting System

www.nascar.com
By Staff Report

2016.01.31-NewsFeed-Martinsville LEDs-IMAGE

Let there be lights … at Martinsville.

The oldest track on the NASCAR circuit displayed its newest measure of modernization Wednesday evening by flicking on the LED lighting system installed over the offseason.

Yes, Martinsville social media manager, she most definitely looks swell.

The 2017 season marks the 0.526-mile track’s 70th anniversary. At the initial announcement in October, the track indicated the project will use an estimated 750 lights mounted from both inside and outside the track.

The lights provide a measure of insurance on those rainy days in Virginia. And while no formal night races for NASCAR’s three national series have been announced, drivers were asked about the prospect of such an event at the Charlotte Motor Speedway Media Tour this week.

“Martinsville night races? Sweet,” Joey Logano said when asked about that prospect. “Short track night races are tough to beat.”

See the story here.

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