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Blog Archives

Will LED Lighting Affect the Game of Baseball?

By Mark Urycki

2017.06.19-NewsFeed-Baseball Lights-IMAGE

The Cleveland Indians next home game is Friday when they host the Minnesota Twins.   It’s a night game, like most of the games in Major League Baseball.

The Indians won the very first American League night game in 1939 in Philadelphia.  The first of any Major League Baseball game played under lights occurred down state in Cincinnati four years earlier.

Now as stadiums change their lighting systems statisticians will be watching to see if the game changes.

Probably the very first of any baseball game played under lights involved two amateur teams in Massachusetts in 1880. Thanks to Cleveland inventor Charles Brush they had arc lamps available.

The professional teams eventually settled on metal halide lamps and for the last 50 years that’s been the standard.  But this year Progressive Field became one of a dozen Major League parks to use lower-wattage LED lighting.

The installation was dome by Ephesus Lighting, a subsidiary of Cleveland’s Eaton Corporation.  Ephesus president Mike Lorenz says the league is backing the change.

“There’s an organization called the Green Sports Alliance it was founded less than 10 years ago. And their whole vision is to encourage teams to reduce their carbon footprint in a variety of ways. And obviously lighting is a major component of that.”

Lorenz figures the LED’s at Progressive Field will reduce the club’s power consumption by 50%.  And because the LED’s can be quickly turned on and off, savings may be more than that.  Indoor arenas and stadiums that are air-conditioned may save the most money because LED’s give off much less heat.

How much light and what color they have is largely up to the teams.  Lorenz says each lamp is made up of many diodes that can be tuned to a specific color temperature,

“We try to create as consistent a light as we can so that during the transition from late afternoon to early evening to evening the field of play is as consistent as it can be for the players and the fans and the broadcasting.”

If you’ve looked into an LED flashlight you know it can be painful.   Lorenz says they work to avoid problems for players that need to look up into the lights to catch a ball.

“For players, what they are concerned about is unintended light or glare zones. And because we can be very precise in how we direct the light we can reduce the number of player glare zones.  Obviously these lights are very bright and if you look straight at it it’s going to be intense.  Our goal is try to mimize those areas where players are forced to look up at those lights”

Lorenz says his company has installed LED’s in hundreds of venues and have heard no complaints from players.  But how will it affect batters?

Read the full story here.

Earth Matters: The Zero-Waste House That Jeter Built

by Susan Hellauer

Birds-eye view of the new Yankee Stadium in the Bronx. Starting with recycled steel and concrete, and diversion of construction waste, the home of the Yankees has become one of Major League Baseball`s greenest operations. Photo courtesy The New York Yankees.

Birds-eye view of the new Yankee Stadium in the Bronx. Starting with recycled steel and concrete, and diversion of construction waste, the home of the Yankees has become one of Major League Baseball`s greenest operations. Photo courtesy The New York Yankees.

It was the hottest ticket in town and I—Yankee fan from my Bronx birth—had snagged one in the left field main deck, thanks to my old friend Wendy, who had a ticket to spare. It was May 14th, Derek Jeter night, and the Yankees honored the 42-year-old former captain and future Hall of Famer by retiring his number (2) and unveiling his Monument Park plaque. The pre-game ceremony—for which all remained standing—was filled with career-spanning clutch-play highlights, Jeter-era Yankee greats, and a Wagner opera’s worth of heroic fanfares.

When the emotional hour-long event was over, the ever-considerate Wendy took all the snack boxes, cups and food wrappers up to discard them. She returned after a long absence looking puzzled: there wasn’t a garbage can to be found anywhere. Finally, she spied a maintenance man pushing a cart, and tossed in the trash.

But that trash in her hands wasn’t trash at all. Rather, it was destined for diversion—to be recycled or composted, never to see a landfill. The new Yankee Stadium, which opened in 2009 across the street from the now-demolished 1923 House that Ruth Built, was designed from the get-go as a sustainable, zero-waste oasis, and not a daily avalanche of food-related garbage, like most stadiums.

Green from the ground up

Thanks to organizations like the 384-member (and growing) Green Sports Alliance, teams and stadiums of all kinds are making strides toward zero waste. The shift is sparing landfills millions of cubic feet of garbage each year, reducing energy and water use, and cutting down on carbon emissions. And the Bronx’s 47,422-seat Yankee Stadium is one of Major League Baseball’s greenest operations.

There was no need to convert the new stadium to a more sustainable profile: it was all baked in, right from the recycled structural steel and concrete aggregate used in its construction.The 31,000 square-foot Great Hall, through which most guests arrive, is built with massive open-air archways that allow for natural cooling and ventilation: no air conditioning required. The energy savings per game from this alone equals about 125 New York City apartments shutting off their air-conditioning for a summer day.

The savings don’t stop there. The stadium’s ultra-efficient plumbing fixtures spare about 3.1 million gallons of water each year, reducing water use by 22 percent. And automated building controls are calibrated to reduce power consumption of lighting and ventilation systems when not in use.

Read the full post here.

To learn more about Green Sports Alliance membership, contact rahul@greensportsalliance.org

Target Field Honored as one of the ‘Greenest Ballparks in America’

By Rochelle Olson, Star Tribune

2017.04.25-NewsFeed-Target Field-IMAGE

Saving those leftover brats, burgers and chicken breasts from Target Field has helped the Minnesota Twins hit gold.

The team learned Saturday that Target Field achieved gold LEED certification for building operations.

The seven-year-old Minneapolis ballpark already had silver certification through LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. LEED is the nation’s leading program in design, construction and high-performance green buildings.

Jase Miller, manager of ballpark operations for the Minnesota Twins, said fans should be proud of helping to make Target Field the greenest ballpark in America. “Together, we’ve kept thousands of tons of trash out of local landfills,” he said. “That’s a huge win not just for Target Field, but for the whole community.”

For the past five years, the Twins have donated unused food to local charities, including 213,622 cased meats, 34,488 hamburgers and 16,599 chicken breasts.

Beer cups, plates and nacho trays were part of 300 tons of trash converted to compost.

Target Field is the first to use Arc, a digital platform, to track sustainability, the team announced. With Arc, the Twins are able to track and increase alternative transportation, energy and water efficiency, waste diversion and recycling.

Through “aggressive recycling” and waste-to-energy programs, the Twins have kept more than 8,200 tons of waste out of local landfills since 2011, the team said. Some 3,213 tons have been recycled, while 2,755 have been sent to the nearby Hennepin Energy Recovery Center and 2,288 tons of organics have been composted, according to a news release.

The team hopes to improve those numbers this year with better equipment and training.

Team President Dave St. Peter said the team wants to honor “the power of sport to inspire, build the best fan experience and cause no unnecessary harm.”

Read the full story here.

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