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Blog Archives

Composting and Ocean-Degradable Straws Help Seattle Seahawks Win Sustainability Award

NFL franchise beats competition from Minnesota Vikings’ Bank Stadium and Liverpool FC to win Stadium Business Award.

CenturyLink Field has undertaken an extensive energy and water use reduction strategy.

CenturyLink Field has undertaken an extensive energy and water use reduction strategy.

NFL franchise Seattle Seahawks has been recognised for its sustainability initiatives, including composting, sustainable food and introducing ocean-degradable straws.

The team and its venue, CenturyLink Field, won the Sustainability and Community Award at the Stadium Business Awards, hosted in Manchester.

Described as “one of the most environmentally-friendly and sustainable sports and entertainment venues in the world”, CenturyLink Field was commended for its composting efforts (with payback in organic vegetables), energy and water usage reduction strategies, food donations to the Salvation Army, sustainable seafood supplies and offering straws not made of plastic.

It beat competition from other shortlisted nominees, such as Minnesota Vikings’ Bank Stadium (for its recycling process at Super Bowl LII), Liverpool FC’s Anfield (for Reds Going Green), NHL Minnesota Wild’s #ThisIsOurIce campaign, Eden Park’s Our Neighbourhood Initiative and Cleveland Cavaliers’ Quiet Space Sensory Room.

The judging panel said the award recognised the venue’s “effort to minimise the impact of stadium events on our shared environment”.

Read full article here.

French Sports Organizations Commit to Wide-Ranging Sustainability Charter

Committees, bodies and venues make 15 pledges, related to catering, transport, procurement, waste and energy devised by French government and WWF.

French sports minister Laura Flessel with all the signatories in Paris yesterday (11 June)

French sports minister Laura Flessel with all the signatories in Paris yesterday (11 June)

More than 100 committees, organisations and venues in the French sport sector have made commitments to reduce their environmental impact by signing a charter of 15 eco-responsibilities.

Gathered together by French sports minister Laura Flessel, the signatories made pledges regarding sustainable food, transport, procurement, waste and natural resources, among others.

The commitments have been developed by the Ministry of Sport in France and the WWF, who will put together an annual report tracking the progress of those signing up to the strategy.

Over the next three years, organisations have committed to:

  • Providing 50% of catering for participants, spectators and staff from sustainable sources. These choices must comply with WWF recommendations (100% certified seasonal catering options, preference to local/regional suppliers etc), and include healthy options. A tracking system to reduce waste must also be in place;
  • Making 80% of journeys completed by spectators, sportspeople and employees happen through active mobility (walking, bike etc), transport and car sharing;
  • Purchasing 80% of their products using a corporate social responsibility selection criteria;
  • Reducing waste by 25% and reuse, recycle or recover 60% of waste; and
  • Consuming 25% of energy from renewable sources

The full list of commitments and timescales can be found below:

Read the full article here.

Stadiums Aim for Greener Architecture

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The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. It is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs.

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia. It is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs.

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, is one of the few football stadiums in the world with retractable roofs. The final phase of the construction of its roof started this past week. The stadium, located in the home of the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL), and the Atlanta United FC of the Major League Soccer (MLS), holds the record of the world’s largest halo board.

The unique roof, once completed, will give officials the option to open and close the roof in as quickly as 12 minutes. During this final phase, construction activities will require the roof to be open in a locked position for 10 days to complete elements of the automation process.

The nine-month-old, $1.6-billion stadium has a 20-foot-high gray concrete box underneath an overpass that can hold up to 680,000 gallons of rainwater, collected mostly from the roof of the enormous stadium. The cistern is one of the environmental centerpieces of the building. It is used to irrigate the vegetation around the building, and by storing much of it, flooding will be reduced in the nearby neighborhood. In other words, the 120-foot-long cistern saves money and helps the surrounding area.

The United States Green Building Council, which grades sustainable design and energy efficiency, has bestowed the stadium with the leadership in energy and environmental design (LEED) platinum certification — the first stadium to win it. The agency gives points to builders based on features like efficient lighting, air-conditioning and water fixtures. Builders also earn points for locating their structures near public transportation, and for using locally-sourced and recycled materials.

The stadium secured 88 of a potential 110 points, more than enough to receive the top LEED ranking. It’s no surprise that sports arenas and stadiums have a far smaller carbon footprint than many factories, shopping malls, or office buildings. Even though they host thousands of people for big events, most days, they are used for short durations. And in recent years, these centres have become showcases for green design.

Though critics may argue that leagues are wrapping themselves in eco-friendly banners to help market their sports, team owners have learned that environmentally-friendly arenas are cheaper to operate.

Read the full article here.

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