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Tailgaters Asked To Work On Sustainability Effort, Not Leave Waste Behind

BY 

Photo By: David Abruzzese

Photo By: David Abruzzese

Penn State is working to eliminate the amount of litter that is left behind at tailgates and help tailgaters better utilize the sorted bags for recycling and trash during the next few weeks of the season.

“We’ve come to enlist the help of all Penn State students, fans, and alumni on how to properly dispose of your trash and how to properly recycle at Penn State games,” said Amy Schirf, education coordinator for the Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority.

Schirf said the lots are no worse than they have been in past years, but that the athletics department, OPP, the Sustainability Institute, and the Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority (all of which are partnering for this effort) are more aware that a stronger push for keeping the lots clean and efficient is needed.

“What’s brought it to light is, after the first game I went to the recycling building and helped the guys sort. I saw the contents of these bags and, to me, it was probably one of the most disgusting things I’ve ever seen,” Schirf said.

For sorting trash at tailgates, fans are asked to use the bags found on white A-frame stands throughout the tailgate lots — with the blue bags for plastic bottles, glass bottles, and metal cans, while the clear bags are for all other waste. Tailgate Ambassadors will also be available throughout the lots to distribute bags and offer help on how to sort waste and recyclables.

Once your bags are sorted, the bags can be left there and staffers will come pick them up after the tailgate.

Aside from sorting and clearing out waste, fans are asked to not leave behind different items such as grills, tents, stumps, and coolers when they leave the tailgate lots.

“The lots looked better after the Indiana game than it did in the last 12 years. So it’s working,” Schirf said about the initiative. “We just want to tell people to keep it up. Don’t litter at your tailgates. Put all your trash in the clear bags, your recycling in the blue. Securely tie them up and leave them there.”

View the story here.

From 2 Bins to 3: Composting at the World Rowing Championships

By UF, IFAS Blog

UF/IFAS agent Randall Penn and UF student volunteer Sophia Sanchez

UF/IFAS agent Randall Penn and UF student volunteer Sophia Sanchez

The last week of September was an important one for Sarasota Florida. It marked the first time the area was hosting a major sporting event, the World Rowing Championships. Over 40,000 were in attendance at the week long event, offering their support to the 900 athletes representing 70 counties.

UF/IFAS Extension played an important role in the 2017 World Rowing Championships. Extension staff and volunteers assisted in collecting food waste in the official UF composting collection bins placed around the venue. The project involved a team of composting volunteers assisting with the collection, separation of recycling and trash from the compost bins.  Focusing on the athlete, food carts and general public areas, the UF/IFAS composting team collected nearly 600 pounds of food waste at the event.

The food waste collected is processed in mulch-lined composting bins, specially constructed in the park’s maintenance area. The unique aspect of the composting project is that the food waste is collected and processed onsite, reducing unnecessary environmental impacts. Additionally, composted material resulting from the project will be reused within the park.  The food waste collection and diversion program is the first of its kind for organized rowing events.

This marked the third rowing event UF/IFAS has provided compost collection in 2017 (Florida State Youth Rowing Championships, US Rowing Nationals, and World Rowing Championships). Collectively, the 3 events have diverted over 1,000 pounds of food waste. The UF/IFAS waste reduction effort is part of a collaborative partnership between Sarasota County’s Parks, Recreation and Natural Resources and Solid Waste departments, Suncoast Aquatic and Nature Center Associates, Inc. (SANCA), and Nathan Benderson Park.

View the blog post here.

Notre Dame Going Even Greener at Football Tailgates

Inside Tailgating
By Carroll Walton

2017.10.16-NewsFeed-Notre Dame-IMAGE

And by greener, we don’t mean the accent color to go along with Notre Dame’s traditional metallic gold and blue. We are talking about the environmentally-friendly practices the University of Notre Dame is implementing at its college football games this fall in a continued effort to be responsible with waste, and we here at Inside Tailgating like the sound of it.

College campuses, in many ways, are on the forefront of recycling efforts. The halls of my dorms at Duke University back in the early 1990s were where I first started the practice of recycling cans. Before that the only recycling we saw much of was at school newspaper drives and bottle-cap collections. We have come a long way! This latest report posted on the Notre Dame athletic site just underscores the kind of impact colleges can have by encouraging environmentally-friendly practices when they set the tone on football Saturdays.

Some of the highlights from what Notre Dame is doing include their efforts to replace seating in the lower bowl of Notre Dame Stadium with recycled or repurposed materials, using LED lighting to reduce power consumption by 60 percent, and the hands-on efforts by student groups to help tailgaters recycle. Notre Dame started its Game Day Recycling Program in 2008, but the school has expanded it this year to include handing out recycling and trash bags to every car entering tailgate lots, employing recycling push-carts in the lots for some hands-on help with the process, and sending out attendants into the lots to help educate fans on how and what they can recycle. Kudos to the Irish!

View the full story here.

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