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Blog Archives

D.C. Sports Arena Will Tap Into Off-Site Solar Project

Solar Industry Magazine
Posted by Joseph Bebon

Monumental Sports & Entertainment and WGL Energy Services Inc. have announced a partnership that will allow Verizon Center – a Washington, D.C., arena home to the Washington Wizards, Capitals, Mystics and Valor, as well as concerts and other entertainment events – to purchase power from a new solar facility in Maryland.

The solar electricity purchased by Monumental Sports & Entertainment to power Verizon Center will be sourced from an off-site, third-party-owned solar facility in Frederick County, Md., and bundled with national solar renewable energy credits – allowing the sports and entertainment facility to operate using 25% solar energy.

“Off-site renewable energy is one of the fastest-growing sectors within the energy industry,” says Dr. Louis J. Hutchinson III, vice president and chief revenue officer for WGL. “As renewable energy offerings continue to mature, it’s exciting to see the sports industry play a major role in sourcing off-site renewable energy.” WGL has served as the official energy and greening partner of Verizon Center since 2015.

“Sustainability is at the core of our operations,” says Dave Touhey, president of venues at Monumental Sports & Entertainment, which owns and operates Verizon Center. “We are excited to expand our energy relationship with WGL Energy by entering into this new partnership to bring more renewable energy to Verizon Center.”

Beginning in late 2017, Verizon Center will receive about 4.7 million kWh per year of energy from 3.5 MW of the solar project. Verizon Center is a member of the Green Sports Alliance, and through this new partnership, the Wizards, Capitals, Mystics and Valor are among the first professional sports teams powered by off-site renewable energy.

Read the full story here.

EPA’s Green Power Partnership Announces Collegiate Green Power Challenge Champions

2017.05.04-NewsFeed-Green Power Challenge-IMAGE

Throughout the 2016-17 academic year, EPA’s Green Power Partnership tracked the collegiate athletic conferences with the highest combined green power usage in the nation. The College and University Green Power Challenge is open to any collegiate athletic conference in the United States.

On April 24, 2017, EPA concluded the Green Power Challenge and recognized the Champion Green Power Conference as well as the largest single green power users within each participating conference as 2016-17 EPA Green Power Challenge conference champions, listed in the below tables. The Champion Green Power Conference for the 2016-2017 Challenge is the Big Ten Conference and the individual school using the most green power is the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Interested in joining the 2017-18 Green Power Challenge? Check out our Steps to Join Green Power Partnership page for more information. To be listed, a conference must have at least two Green Power Partners and an aggregate green power purchase of at least 10 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) across the conference.

This list is current as of April 5, 2017. This is the final update to the 2016-17 College & University Green Power Challenge. Thank you and congratulations to all participating schools!

Read more here.

 

Green Innovation In Sport: How Future Stadiums Will Look

Huffington Post UK
By Robert Bright

Amsterdam Arena

Amsterdam Arena

Nothing can compete with the atmosphere of a packed sports stadium. We go in our millions every week to arenas around the world where we cheer on our team, or maybe sing-a-long to our favourite band. But while there might be plenty of energy coming from the fans, the stadium itself tends to consume it at huge rates.

To give you some idea, the electricity used by Wembley Stadium’s floodlights for one match in London is equivalent to watching 20,936 football matches on TV at home. Then there’s the waste to think about, with anywhere in the region of 10-15 tonnes of rubbish produced per game in most stadiums. And that’s before we get into the size and impact of the structure itself, the materials used in its construction, and the means by which people get to and from the venue.

Stadiums and the smart city

For some years now, architects, designers, engineers and ecologists have been radically rethinking the stadium to bring it in line with environmental recommendations and our changing attitudes towards the planet. What’s more, stadiums are central to the concept of the smart city.

In environments where Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will increasingly play a part, stadiums will become providers as well as consumers, proxy power plants, storing and transferring energy that will be used elsewhere. This is a trend we’re already seeing in other large structures, like the PricewaterhouseCoopers building in London and the Bank of America tower in New York.

One of the biggest innovations and best examples of a stadium integrating into the smart city concept is the world-famous Amsterdam ArenA (pictured above), home to the legendary Netherlands side, Ajax. Nissan, power management company Eaton and The Mobility House have developed an energy storage system that makes the energy management of the Amsterdam ArenA more efficient, sustainable and reliable.

It makes use of repurposed batteries from Nissan’s EV car, the LEAF – 280 of them in total. These batteries are used for back up power but will ultimately replace the stadiums diesel generators, providing four Megawatts of power and four Megawatts of storage capacity. The technology to operate the system in this complex setup was developed by The Mobility House.

Read the full story here.

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