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Composting and Ocean-Degradable Straws Help Seattle Seahawks Win Sustainability Award

NFL franchise beats competition from Minnesota Vikings’ Bank Stadium and Liverpool FC to win Stadium Business Award.

CenturyLink Field has undertaken an extensive energy and water use reduction strategy.

CenturyLink Field has undertaken an extensive energy and water use reduction strategy.

NFL franchise Seattle Seahawks has been recognised for its sustainability initiatives, including composting, sustainable food and introducing ocean-degradable straws.

The team and its venue, CenturyLink Field, won the Sustainability and Community Award at the Stadium Business Awards, hosted in Manchester.

Described as “one of the most environmentally-friendly and sustainable sports and entertainment venues in the world”, CenturyLink Field was commended for its composting efforts (with payback in organic vegetables), energy and water usage reduction strategies, food donations to the Salvation Army, sustainable seafood supplies and offering straws not made of plastic.

It beat competition from other shortlisted nominees, such as Minnesota Vikings’ Bank Stadium (for its recycling process at Super Bowl LII), Liverpool FC’s Anfield (for Reds Going Green), NHL Minnesota Wild’s #ThisIsOurIce campaign, Eden Park’s Our Neighbourhood Initiative and Cleveland Cavaliers’ Quiet Space Sensory Room.

The judging panel said the award recognised the venue’s “effort to minimise the impact of stadium events on our shared environment”.

Read full article here.

Kansas City Chiefs Debuts Compostable Peanut Bags During Football Game

By Anna Spiewak, BASF Corp.

The new bright red peanut bag designed using certified compostable materials is replacing the standard laminated polypropylene peanut bag currently available at stadiums. (Image courtesy of Amarak)

The new bright red peanut bag designed using certified compostable materials is replacing the standard laminated polypropylene peanut bag currently available at stadiums. (Image courtesy of Amarak)

This article is sponsored by BASF.

It takes a village to make a compostable peanut bag. After all, it took the collaboration of four companies to make it happen: BASF; Hampton Farms; Aramark and the Kansas City Chiefs.

It all started with the professional football team. As an initiative to implement additional sustainability efforts at Arrowhead Stadium, Brandon Hamilton, Kansas City Chiefs vice president of stadium operations, knew a compostable peanut package would get the stadium one step closer towards the Chiefs’ environmental initiative, “Extra Yard for the Environment.”

“As corporate citizens, it is important for us to do our part towards sustainable practices. We all understand the platform we have in professional sports. We have the opportunity to lead by example and be change agents in this industry,” Hamilton told BASF in an exclusive interview. “In looking at our diversion process, there are a couple of obstacles in the way of reaching higher numbers; some items that our concessionaires sell are either not compostable or not recyclable, and the peanut bag is an example of that.”

The trend towards waste reduction is not new. About 32 million pounds of food waste are diverted annually, according to Missouri Organic Recycling, the local Kansas City composter, which is enough to fill 15 football fields 1 foot deep.

Most sports venues today have some sort of recycling or composting programs in place. Providing separate collection bins for fans to dispose their waste is a start. But diverting waste from landfills is where the real benefit comes. Hamilton wanted to be the first. Part of his waste diversion plan was to come up with compostable peanut bags or stop selling them at the stadium altogether.

Read the full story here.

Environment Scores Big Win With Zero-Waste Legacy Project at Super Bowl LII

PepsiCo

Environment scores big win with zero-waste legacy project at Super Bowl LII (PRNewsfoto/PepsiCo)

Environment scores big win with zero-waste legacy project at Super Bowl LII (PRNewsfoto/PepsiCo)

PURCHASE, N.Y.Feb. 22, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The NFL, in partnership with PepsiCo, Aramark, U.S. Bank Stadium, SMG and the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, scored a zero-waste legacy project at Super Bowl LII, with 91 percentii of all trash generated on gameday from 67,612 fans responsibly recovered through composting, recycling and reuse. The landmark project marks the highest diversion rate achieved at U.S. Bank Stadium and at any previous Super Bowl, and aims to serve as the benchmark for future large-scale events.

The results are in following the big game: nearly 63 tons of the 69 tons of gameday waste were recovered through recycling or donation for reuse (62 percent) and composting (29 percent). Recovering waste through composting and recycling reduces waste disposal costs and provides several environmental benefits including reduction of landfill use and reduction of the greenhouse gas generated by the landfill process, gasses which contribute significantly to global warming.

“The zero-waste legacy project is a testament to teamwork, with multiple partners coming together to achieve an ambitious environmental goal,” said Director of the NFL’s Environmental Program JACK GROH. “The NFL is proud that this program was not only successful at Super Bowl LII, but will also serve as a permanent installation at the stadium and leave a lasting impact on the community.”

U.S. Bank Stadium partners, including the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, stadium operator SMG, and Aramark, kicked off the effort to achieve a zero-waste operation in 2017, and were joined by the NFL and PepsiCo in the lead-up to Super Bowl LII.

“SMG is always striving to raise industry standards through our operation at U.S. Bank Stadium and our commitment to sustainability is no different. In our first season, we produced a waste diversion rate of 20 percent. Over the course of our second season our team increased that diversion rate to 91 percent,” says PATRICK TALTY, SMG General Manager at U.S. Bank Stadium. “Developing a successful and long-term zero-waste program has always been our goal. The diversion improvement we have seen to date is rare in the world of facility management and is a testament to the dedication of all of our stadium partners.”

“U.S. Bank Stadium’s journey to the zero-waste threshold has been demanding, and we couldn’t have gotten here without the commitment of our stadium partners,” said MICHAEL VEKICH, chair of the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, owner of U.S. Bank Stadium. “We look forward to sharing our experiences with other facilities who are interested in this important sustainability program.”

Read the full story.

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