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Blog Archives

Sustainable Sports: Design Good Sports

CLADBOOK
By Chris DeVolder, HOK

2016.01.23-NewsFeed-HOK Chris DeVolder-IMAGE

Hundreds of years ago, a sports facility served as a city’s hub. It occupied the main public square or area where citizens assembled to support civic activities and housed functions including hospitality, food and retail.

By the mid-20th century, many new sports venues were built outside the central business district. Such facilities are often surrounded by parking space and focus on a single use, resulting in disconnection from the city’s day-to-day life and infrastructure.

Today, many new sports facilities are returning to city centres as part of sports-oriented, mixed-use developments. There’s a focus on engaging residents, daytime workers and visitors every day of the week – not just on game or match days.

Developers of arenas in cities including Edmonton in Canada and Detroit, Michigan, are following the successful model of the Kansas City Power & Light District and the Nationwide Arena District in Columbus, Ohio, which integrate sports, entertainment, retail, office and residential. These projects promote related development and maximise return on investment while creating vibrant, sustainable urban communities.

As well as economic sustainability, design strategies related to the site and landscape, transportation, materials and resources, energy and the indoor environment can help operators minimise impact on the environment while improving the bottom line.

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P&G Pledges Zero Manufacturing Waste by 2020

Environmental Leader

2016.01.11-NewsFeed-P&G Zero Waste-IMAGE

Procter & Gamble says it will eliminate all manufacturing waste from its global network of more than 100 production sites by 2020.

P&G won’t put a dollar amount on its planned invest in recycling and reuse to achieve this goal. A spokesperson told Environmental Leader that P&G anticipates savings once it eliminates all manufacturing waste.

Previously, the company said it has saved almost $2 billion through waste and energy costs since 2007.

The company says 56 percent of its production sites globally send zero manufacturing waste to landfill. Over the next four years P&G will have to eliminate or reuse about 650,000 metric tons of waste to achieve its zero waste goal.

P&G plans to do this by ensuring all incoming materials are: converted into finished product, recycled internally or externally, or re-used in alternative ways through partnerships.

For example, in Lima, Ohio, liquid waste from products like Tide and Gain are being converted to alternative fuels sources to power vehicles. Non-recyclable plastic laminate materials from plants in Mandideep and Baddi, India are shredded and pressed into low-cost building panels. And in China, production waste from one facility is composted as “nutritional soil” for local parks while waste from another facility is used as a raw material to make bricks.

Read the full story here.
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