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Rogers Place Achieves LEED Silver Certification

Canada Green Building Council
Sustainable City Network

Oilers

Photo Credit: Edmonton Oilers

EDMONTON — The city of Edmonton, with Oilers Entertainment Group, has announced Rogers Place has received LEED Silver certification.

“The city of Edmonton aims to be a national leader in setting and achieving the highest standards of environmental preservation and sustainability,” said Councillor Bev Esslinger. “This certification not only helps us reach this goal but positively impacts the health, quality of life and resiliency of our citizens and city.”

The city of Edmonton has a sustainable building policy that mandates the construction of all new buildings to strive for LEED Silver certification as a minimum requirement. Planning, design and construction of the arena and adjacent facilities followed LEED requirements throughout the process and achieved certification through the LEED goals of development density, community connectivity and alternative transportation.

“Congratulations to the city of Edmonton and the project team involved in this LEED Silver certification for Rogers Place Arena,” said Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the Canada Green Building Council. “Designing and building a facility of this magnitude to meet rigorous green building standards is an ambitious undertaking, but one with the potential to have a positive impact on visitors, where they can see sustainability in action. This certification sets a strong example for other large venues in Canada that every building can achieve superior environmental performance.”

Rogers Place is the first NHL facility in Canada built to the LEED Silver certification requirements, demonstrating efficient systems for lighting, heating, cooling and ventilation in building design. The commitment to reduce the building’s environmental impact continues into operations of the facility. Oilers Entertainment Group is a member of the Green Sports Alliance and has embraced green operations including cleaning, education and food waste handling.

Read the full story here.

Former UN Climate Chief Christiana Figueres to Co-lead Formula E’s Advisory Board

Climate Action

Formula E announced that its new Global Advisory board will be co-led by UN climate champion Christiana Figueres- one of the key figures who secured the landmark Paris Agreement.

2017.12.13-NewsFeed-UN Climate Chief-IMAGE

Former UN Climate Chief Christiana Figueres Photo Credit: Climate Action in partnership with UN Environment

Christiana Figueres, best known for her work as Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), will join Alain Prost, the four-time Formula 1 world champion in leading the new Global Advisory board aiming to consult on topics including sustainability, media and business.

She said: “In order to meet the objectives set out by the Paris Agreement and prevent global temperatures spiralling out of control, we must have a need for speed and react quickly”.

“This unique forum at Formula E will allow us to bring great minds together with the same common goal, speeding-up the transition and use of electric vehicles in everyday life”.

Alejandro Agag, Founder & CEO of Formula E commented on the announcement by underlying the role of Formula E to perpetuate the climate action momentum.

He said: “Formula E is more than just a race, it’s a platform to inspire change – a change in perception, a change in attitude and behaviour, and a change in the way we live our lives and actively influence the future of our planet”.

Read the full story here.

Building the Green Olympics

By Mark Spence
Construction Global

Photo/Rendering Credit: LA 2028 Organizing Committee

Photo/Rendering Credit: LA 2028 Organizing Committee

Following the recommendations contained in Agenda 2020 by the IOC, and its request that candidate cities must present projects closely adhering to their long-term social, financial and environmental planning needs, now, more than ever, ‘greenness’ will be a vital cornerstone of any winning Olympic bid. With this in mind, what new measures, techniques and approaches can we expect to see implemented from the 2024 cycle onwards? 

The history of the Olympics is littered with what could be considered failures. Ghost town Olympic villages, redundant stadiums and a sheer lack of concrete evidence of genuine sustainability from previous Games, highlight some of the issues endured by previous hosts. It’s hardly surprising then that Boston, Budapest, Rome and Hamburg all pulled their bids for the 2024 games mid-race, fearing high costs and local opposition.

So, what will Paris and LA do differently?

The Paris masterplan

“For us it is quite simple. Our vision is the most sustainable Games ever,” Paris bid co-Chair and member of the IOC’s Sustainability and Legacy Commission, Tony Estanguet, told the South China Morning Post in January. “We will also have low carbon installations for the rare venues we have to build and we will use specific materials to reduce the overall carbon footprint.” These claims are backed up by the Paris committee’s aims in their project program including:

  • 100% bio-based materials
  • 100%green energy during the Games
  • Over 26 hectares of biodiversity created on the Olympic sites in Seine-Saint-Denis

In addition, architects, Populous and engineers, Egis, will mastermind the construction of 38 Olympic and Paralympic venues across Paris. Their masterplan will involve the use of a number of existing buildings in the city and see temporary venues installed in some of the capital’s most famous attractions. The Eiffel Tower and Champs-Élysées as well as the aforementioned River Seine will all become backdrops for events.

Central to the winning Paris bid is the idea of using existing infrastructure, more specifically, venues and temporary structures. Indeed, the only new major construction will be an aquatics centre. Crucially, these ambitions are echoed by the LA 2028 committee’s proposals.

Radical reuse

LA 2028 has delivered a comprehensive sustainability program built on the concept of ‘radical reuse’. Essentially this idea focuses on the use of LA’s existing world-class venues, rather than creating any new permanent structures. Executive Director of Sustainability and Legacy, Brence Culp, told Global Construction: “Radical reuse is the core principle of the LA 2028 Sustainability Program. It refers to LA 2028’s plan that requires no new permanent construction. Every facility of our Games Plan, from sports venues, to the Olympic Village at UCLA, to the Media Village and other media facilities at the University of Southern California (USC), already exists, will exist independently of the Games, or will be temporary. This approach allows LA 2028 to avoid the environmental and carbon impact of the large construction projects typically associated with the Games.”

Read the full story here.

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