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Sailors for the Sea and Oceana Plan to Join Forces

Sailors for the Sea

David Rockefeller Jr, joins Oceana’s board, Sailors for the Sea board to join Oceana’s Ocean Council

Oceana will continue to build constituency for the seas among 12 million recreational boaters

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NEWPORT, RI and WASHINGTON, DC –  Sailors for the Sea, the leading ocean conservation organization that engages, educates, inspires and activates the sailing and boating community, and Oceana, the world’s largest international conservation organization focused solely on protecting and restoring the world’s oceans, announced today they are joining forces.

“Our board, staff and all of us are so pleased to be joining Oceana’s team, “said Sailors for the Sea co-founder David Rockefeller, Jr. “This will strengthen our ability to help sailors and power boaters make a difference in saving the oceans they depend on.”

Oceana will continue the legacy of Sailors for the Sea through engaging the nearly 12 million strong recreational boating community on ocean conservation and will seek to unite a core constituency of sailors and boaters whose support will help win victories that will help to save the world’s oceans.

“Sailors and recreational boaters are highly credible ocean leaders,” said Oceana CEO Andrew F. Sharpless. “Sailors for the Sea will now help us reach them in in ways that will prove truly beneficial for Oceana’s conservation campaigns.”

The two entities’ boards of directors, following an effort initiated by Oceana, unanimously approved the plan to combine. Sailors for the Sea will file a petition with the Massachusetts Attorney General and the Supreme Judicial Court for approval of the combination under Massachusetts law.  In the meantime, David Rockefeller, Jr. has joined Oceana’s Board of Directors and Sailors for the Sea board members have been invited to join Oceana’s Ocean Council.

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Open Venues at Risk of Disappearing, Says Climate Coalition Report

BBC Sport

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St Andrews last hosted The Open in 2015. Photo Source: Getty Images

Open Championship venues such as St Andrews and Royal Troon could be under water by the end of the century if sea levels rise even slightly as a result of climate change, according to a new report.

The Climate Coalition says golf, football and cricket face an “unexpected threat”, with cricket to be the “hardest hit”.

The report predicts “cancelled football matches, flooded cricket grounds and golf courses crumbling into the sea”.

It adds that rising winter temperatures mean the Scottish skiing industry could collapse within 50 years.

The report says six of the UK’s seven wettest years on record have occurred since 2000, with cricket’s County Championship already losing thousands of overs every season.

“Climate change is already impacting our ability to play and watch the sports we love,” said the report, adding that extreme weather is a factor in declining participation and lost revenue.

The report says “only a small increase in sea-level rise would imperil all of the world’s links courses before the end of the century”.

The Open is the only one of golf’s majors played in the UK and is hosted on links courses, including – as well at St Andrews and Royal Troon – Royal Birkdale, Hoylake, Royal Lytham & St Annes, Muirfield, Sandwich, Turnberry, Portrush and 2018 venue Carnoustie.

It adds that “more than 450 years of golfing history” at Montrose, one of the five oldest courses in the world, is at risk of being washed away by rising seas and coastal erosion linked to climate change.

Research published by Dundee University in 2016 showed the North Sea has crept 70 metres towards Montrose within the past 30 years.

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First ‘Zero-Emissions’ Winter Olympics Kicks off in South Korea

Climate Action

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Image source: Climate Action. Photo Credit: 2018 Olympics.

The 23rd Winter Olympic games has now opened in what it is hoped will be one of the most sustainable events in the tournament’s history.

The games, taking place in PyeongChang, South Korea, has sustainable thinking at its heart with a goal of becoming the first zero-emissions event in its history.

Not only has it procured 190 megawatts of wind power to meet more than 100 per cent of its energy needs, but all six stadiums have been awarded with ‘green-building’ certifications. Organisers have ensured that a forest area twice the size of the event has been restored, and the Olympic Park has been built on the site of an old landfill, covering 86,696 square meters.

Speaking at a forum this week, International Olympic Committee member Mario Pescante said this year’s games shares the objective of furthering “the peaceful development of humanity”

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