Team USA Rides FSC Snowboards to Olympic Gold

FSC United States

2018.02.20-FSC Snow Boards-IMAGE

Image via FSC United States, Photo source: Burton

As the world watched Chloe Kim win gold in snowboard halfpipe at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, at FSC, we were watching her snowboard. Made by Burton, Chloe’s board has an FSC-certified wood core, and is one of many FSC-certified boards Burton manufactures. Burton’s commitment to responsible forest management is just one part of their industry-leading sustainability strategy, which also includes diverting waste from landfills, establishing an end-of-life program at retail, and relying on solar energy at their headquarters. Burton was also selected to outfit the U.S. Olympics Snowboarding team this year, drawing on space suits for their inspiration. After watching Chloe Kim, Shaun White and others go big in the halfpipe, the design seems fitting.

For more information, visit www.burton.com.

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Cape Town Sports Hit Hard By Water Crisis

GreenSportsBlog
Lew Blaustein

2018.02.20.CapeTownWater-IMAGE

The pitch at the usually lush Hamilton Rugby Club ground, Stephan Oval, in Green Point (Photo credit: IOL News)

Cape Town, South Africa’s largest city with a population about the size of Los Angeles, is facing a catastrophic water crisis. Authorities have sounded the alarm that as soon as June 4 — ominously referred to as “Day Zero” — the drought-stricken city will have to cut off the taps to all homes and most businesses, leaving nearly all of the city’s 3.7 million residents without access to clean running water. How will the water crisis impact the city’s sports teams and events?

Cape Town, South Africa is a sports-mad city.

Rugby, soccer, cricket, cycling, and more have passionate followings among many of the “Mother City’s” 3.7 million residents.

But with June 4 expected to be the day the city runs out of clean, running water — considered to be the case when water levels in dams reach 13.5 percent — sports will find itself in an unfamiliar, yet wholly justifiable position: The back burner.

Before we get into how Cape Town’s sports teams and events are reacting to and are affected by the water crisis, let’s take a quick look at how the city got to this point.

NO WATER IN CAPE TOWN? HOW IS THAT POSSIBLE?

According to numerous reports from experts, for the last decade or more, Cape Town’s authorities have been forward thinkers and actors on water conservation. Writing in the February 9 issue of Vox.com, Zeeshan Alleem asserted that the city “worked hard to fix leaks in the pipes that distribute water across the city….Leaky pipes account for between 30 and 40 percent of a city’s lost water…Cape Town has reduced the amount of water it loses through leaks to about half of that. And in 2015…Cape Town even won a prestigious international award for its water conservation policies.”

Despite these successes and others, dams that were completely full just a few years ago now stand at about a quarter capacity and Day Zero is less than four months away. How did this happen?

The main culprits are a once-in-a-century, three-year drought, along with a dangerous lack of water supply diversification — Cape Town gets more than 99 percent of its water supply from dams that rely solely on rain; underground aquifers and desalination are not part of the mix. And, as University of Cape Town hydrologist Piotr Wolski told Laura Poppick in the February 13 edition of Smithsonian.com, climate change is serving as a crucial accelerant.

Read the full story.

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South Korea Wins a Gold Medal for Sustainability

Energy Live News
By Jonny Bairstow

Image: Singulyarra / Shutterstock

Image: Singulyarra / Shutterstock

South Korea should win a gold medal for its energy efficiency successes in its hosting of the Winter Olympics.

That’s the verdict from the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE), which says the PyeongChang Organising Committee for the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (POCOG) has managed to cut carbon intensity through the careful management of transportation and accommodation.

The group says the recent construction of a 120-kilometre high-speed railway connecting the site of the games to important cities and airports means trains can reduce the carbon footprint of passengers to an eighth of what they would generate travelling in petrol or diesel vehicles.

POCOG predicts 6,654 tonnes of emissions can be saved if 420,000 visitors use the railway rather than personal vehicles.

It also signed an agreement with the Korea Electric Power Corporation to provide staff with 150 electric vehicles (EVs) and 24 rapid charging stations.

These will remain after the event finishes, providing infrastructure to support the continued use of efficient EVs.

POCOG also built 11 green sports facilities, designed to consume less energy and reduce pollution throughout their life cycle, from design to construction and maintenance.

These include the Gangneung Ice Arena, which ASE says saves energy through LED lighting, efficient insulation, airtight doors and windows and a water circulation system.

Read the full story here.

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