San Diego Padres Pave The Way For Sustainable Food

It’s 7:30 a.m. on game day at Petco Park in downtown San Diego and the food trucks have just started rolling in.

As part of his daily routine, Petco Park executive chef Carlos Vargas awaits the fresh produce.

Duo Entrée: California Black Cod, Lemon Grass Beurre Blanc, Candied Baby Carrots, Lava Salt Prime Braise Kalbi Short Rib, Confit Cipollini Onions Truffle Risotto Purse

Duo Entrée:
California Black Cod, Lemon Grass Beurre Blanc, Candied Baby Carrots, Lava Salt
Prime Braise Kalbi Short Rib, Confit Cipollini Onions Truffle Risotto Purse

During home games, local growers like Suzie’s Farm and Melissa’s Produce, based out of Los Angeles, make daily deliveries of fresh vegetables and fruits.

Petco Park executive chef Carlos Vargas inspects a fresh bag of lettuce on a Melissa’s Farm produce truck, Aug. 17, 2015.

“See the quality of the raspberries that we have in here? It’s just unbelievable how good and sweet they are,” said Vargas after tasting one of the raspberries.

In late June, the San Diego Padres and concession partner Delaware North were recognized as“Champions of Game Day Food” in a joint report by the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Green Sports Alliance.

The report named the Padres and Petco Park as one of the top locations for stadium eats in the country for their sustainability efforts and food quality.

Allen Hershkowitz, president for Green Sports Alliance, said the Padres are setting an example for other stadiums.

“The Padres are providing valuable lessons not only to professional sports venues throughout North America, but actually professional sports venues throughout the world,” Hershkowitz said.

More than 95 percent of the San Diego Padres concession stands and restaurants get their food from Southern California.

 

Read the full article from KPBS.

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Could we make tennis rackets out of atmospheric CO2? Science says yes

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You know the old saying: “When life gives you atmospheric CO2, capture it, turn it into carbon fiber, and build cool stuff with it.” No? That’s OK — I just made it up, but let the record show that if this does become an old saying, you heard it here first.

The fibers in this microscope image are made of carbon, produced via a new method that also removes carbon dioxide from the air.

The fibers in this microscope image are made of carbon, produced via a new method that also removes carbon dioxide from the air.

Researchers at George Washington University have figured out a way to transform everyone’s favorite greenhouse gas into the super-strong and lightweight wonder material known as carbon fiber. As MIT Technology Review reports, carbon fiber (and especially carbon nanofiber) has become somewhat of a darling material among engineers, who are using it in all kinds of things: airplanes, cars, tennis rackets, wind turbines. Unfortunately, carbon fiber can be pretty expensive to make, which is why chemist Stuart Licht and his colleagues at GWU are actually killing two birds with one stone. Their technology both sucks CO2 out of the atmosphere and makes cheaper carbon fiber.

According to Technology Review, Licht and his team estimate that with their technology, the amount of atmospheric CO2 could return to pre-industrial levels within ten years — and that’s even if we don’t significantly slow our emissions in the interim. All they’d need is an area about 10 percent the size of the Sahara Desert in order to capture and convert enough CO2 — a process that involves dissolving the CO2 into molten carbonate.

Read the full article from Grist.

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Ex-NFL Player Who Made $25 Million Quit Football At Age 29 To Become A Farmer

In 2009, Jason Brown signed a five-year, $37.5 million contract with the St. Louis Rams that made him the highest-paid center in the NFL.

Five years later, after earning more than $25 million of that contract, Brown is a farmer who is helping to feed the hungry.

Credit: MARK DOLEJS / Dispatch Staff, PeaceMakers

Credit: MARK DOLEJS / Dispatch Staff, PeaceMakers

CBS News caught up with Brown in Louisburg, North Carolina, where he runs a 1,000-acre farm after learning how to grow crops on YouTube.

Brown was drafted 124th overall in 2005 and played nine seasons in the NFL before getting cut by the Rams in the spring of 2012.

At age 29, he still had plenty of NFL years ahead of him. He wasn’t playing at the level he was in 2009, but his career was far from over. He had interest from numerous teams, including an offer from the Baltimore Ravens.

But he walked away from the game. The NFL world was surprised, and ESPN ran a story with the headline, “The Curious Case Of Jason Brown.”

“My agent, he told me, ‘You’re making the biggest mistake of your life,'” Brown told CBS. “And I looked right back at him and I said, ‘No I am not.'”

Brown is doing this to help the less fortunate. He grows sweet potatoes and other vegetables and donates his harvest to food pantries. According to the New & Observer, he has given away 46,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and 10,000 pounds of cucumbers this fall.

Read the full article from Business Insider.

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