CU Boulder Earns 3 LEED Platinum Certifications for Athletic Facilities

School Construction News

Solar array on top of the athletic practice facility taken during 2016 aerial photography over Boulder and the CU Bouder campus. (Photo by Glenn Asakawa/University of Colorado)

Solar array on top of the athletic practice facility taken during 2016 aerial photography over Boulder and the CU Boulder campus. (Photo by Glenn Asakawa/University of Colorado)

BOULDER, Colo. — Three athletic buildings at the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU) were certified in fall 2017 with the highest possible LEED rating — LEED Platinum. With this latest certification by the USGBC, CU now has 25 buildings certified LEED Gold or better, either for new construction or major renovations.

The three buildings that were certified LEED Platinum include the 212,000-square-foot Champions Center, the 109,000-square-foot net-zero-energy Indoor Practice Facility (IPF) and extensive renovations done to the Dal Ward Athletic Center. All three of the athletic buildings were included in a CU athletic department facilities upgrade project that arrived at completion in 2016. All three buildings were LEED Platinum–certified by early December 2017, raising the total number of LEED Platinum buildings at CU to 10.

Completion of the new Champions Center brought a new home for CU athletics administration, the CU football program, Olympic sports, the CU Sports Medicine and Performance Center as well as the Champions Club. The IPF is a climate-controlled facility and includes a full football field as well as a six-lane, 300-meter track. Upgrades to the Dal Ward Athletic Center feature new locker rooms and a new weight room for CU Olympic sports, a new room for the Herbst Academic Center and the Touchdown Club room. The Champions Center as well as the Dal Ward construction also included the addition of a pair of premium seating areas at Folsom Field.

“Achieving LEED Platinum for a project of this magnitude is a testament to the work and collaboration of several campus departments and partners,” said David Kang, vice chancellor for infrastructure and safety at CU in a recent statement. “Athletics has been a key driver of campus efforts to be a leader in sustainability, and this project is a shining example of that.”

The three-buildings project was led by Denver-based Mortenson Construction and Populous — a Denver-based architecture firm — as a joint design-build venture. Noresco, an energy services company based in Boulder, Colo., provided sustainability consulting services on the project. Construction on the project began in 2014, with different aspects of the project opening in 2015 and 2016 before its final completion at the end of 2016.

The most noteworthy sustainability feature of the athletic facilities upgrade project is the 850-kilowatt solar array that sits atop the IPF, with an estimated annual production of more than 1 million kilowatt hours. All of the energy use of the IPF — including 28 percent of the overall usage by the Athletics facilities upgrades — is offset by the impressive solar array.

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Denver Broncos Stay Safe During Winter Training Thanks to New Ice-melt Solution

BASF

The football team’s headquarters say goodbye to granular salt deicers and hello to a better alternative.

2018.01.08-Broncos&BASF-IMAGE

The UCHealth Training Center is the corporate headquarters of the Denver Broncos, where the team trains six to seven days a week. (Photos: Gabriel Christus/Denver Broncos Team Photographer)

Brooks Dodson is the Director of Sports Turf & Grounds for The Denver Broncos Football Club and that is no small feat. He is responsible for approximately 26 acres of property at The UCHealth Training Center—the corporate headquarters of the Denver Broncos.

Therefore, when winter rolls around, he is the one responsible for the highly valued football stars’ safety, players who cannot afford any slip-and-fall accidents and sit out the entire season. Add to that mix the amount of media, staff and fans that visit the property and come through the center’s doors—and walkway safety is a must.

“Getting everyone in/out and around the facility safely is our responsibility, and we take that seriously.  We don’t want anyone hurt,” said Dodson.

As a result, every year, Dodson’s facility staff would bring out the calcium chloride—various salt deicers—and apply it with a spreader or a cup to prevent slippery walkways. However, the rock-salt product residue would be dragged indoors, damaging carpets, tiles and concrete in and around the buildings.

“When you are handling or spreading bags of ice melt … you can smell it and if the wind is wrong it’ll get in your mouth and you can taste it. I don’t know about you, but I prefer not putting that type of stuff in my body,” he added.

Dodson decided it was time to seek out a more environmentally friendly product—in the form of a liquid.

He attended the Sports Turf Managers Association tradeshow last winter and found just that in Entry. Entry ice melt is a liquid deicer based on potassium formate, a cleaner alternative to chloride-based salts, derived from formic acid, an organic acid produced locally by BASF Corp. in Geismar, Louisiana. Formate salts are less corrosive and have a lesser impact on surrounding flora, which makes them both more plant and pet friendly. Entry breaks down hydrogen bonds formed when water freezes. As a result, once the product is sprayed, it removes thin layers of ice and snow, and prevents new snow from accumulating or icing. Entry reduces the freezing point of water to approximately minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Vestas 11th Hour Racing Joins “Take 3 for the Sea” Campaign

Grant is given to Take 3 by 11th Hour Racing to further their education work

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA (5 January 2018) – From the high seas of the Volvo Ocean Race, Vestas 11th Hour Racing announced their commitment to join the #Take3fortheSea movement to fight plastic pollution through simple actions. The concept is easy, anywhere you go, be it the beach, the marina or a walk in the woods, pick up at least 3 pieces of litter.

As part of this engagement, 11th Hour Racing, co-title partner of Vestas 11th Hour Racing, will give Take 3 a $10,000 grant – this is the fourth of twelve grants that 11th Hour Racing will award throughout the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean as part of the teams legacy project.

To help grow this global initiative and be active players in mitigating the issue of ocean pollution, the sailors of Vestas 11th Hour Racing have created a video to encourage their fans to join them! Please help spread this movement by sharing this video – and picking up 3 pieces of litter on your next walk! Show your work and help spread the message by snapping a picture of the trash and sharing with the hashtags #Take3fortheSea and #Vestas11thhourracing.

Tim Silverwood, co-founder, and CEO of Take 3 joined the team in Melbourne to discuss the movement’s impact and plans for the future. Take 3’s aim is to use education to inspire participation to reduce global plastic pollution. The organization’s education programs have reached over 120,000 school students and over 150,000 community members since 2011. Through technology and online communications, the group aims to expand globally and develop citizen science programs to enable community members to provide valuable information on plastic pollution distribution and sources. Additionally, Tim made a splash as the leg jumper for the start of Leg 4.

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