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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Memorial Stadium Works to Improve Sustainability Efforts

By Jenna Puritz, KOMU

2017.08.31-NewsFeed-MO Memorial Coliseum-IMAGE

As a member of the Green Sports Alliance, the athletic department at the University of Missouri is working to improve sustainability efforts.

The events manager for the athletics department said the biggest focus is educating fans and making sure they’re aware of the sustainability efforts and that fans are contributing as well.

“We want people to have to make that choice, so you see a recycle or trash bin and you have to say ‘I have this plastic bottle, and I’m going to choose to put it in one of those bins’,” Tony Wirkus said.

MU researchers released a study today on how much waste is created at Memorial Stadium.

Ron McGarvey, an assistant professor of industrial engineering and public affairs at MU, lead a team of students and other researchers.

“Auditing involves actually setting up a table in the parking lot and tearing open the bag and seeing what you find inside,” McGarvey said. “Whenever we opened a bag we had scales nearby and we would weigh the composition of the bag.”

McGarvey and Wirkus are working toward a broader initiative called “zero-waste.”

According to McGarvey, zero-waste is 90 percent of all the waste that’s diverted away from landfills. In order to determine this waste, people need to know the composition of the waste first, which is what McGarvey’s team did by digging through the waste.

“We examined not only the waste coming out of the stadium, but also we went to the food preparation facility where all the food for the stadium is prepared,” McGarvey said.

The team spent the days leading up to games at the food preparation site, and then audited the waste coming out of the stadium after the games.

McGarvey and Wirkus both said it’s a lengthy process that will take several steps to accomplish the zero-waste goal.

“A big portion of that is fan education,” Wirkus said. “We can put all the recycling containers out there and give out all the blue bags of recycling that we want, but ultimately we need to get the fans coming to the games to buy into that and choose to recycle.”

See the full story here.

 

Can the Best New Female Racer Make It to Nascar? That’s the $15 Million Question

Bloomberg Businessweek
By Josh Dean

Julia Landauer is just what the sport needs, yet she’s still scrapping for sponsors.

PHOTO CREDIT: CAIT OPPERMANN FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

PHOTO CREDIT: CAIT OPPERMANN FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

As soon as she could see over the steering wheel, Julia Landauer switched to cars, and it was good. Up to that point, she had been racking up trophies as one of the country’s best young go-kart racers; at 13 she was finally able to see out a car’s windshield while also working its pedals, so off she went in 2005 to the famed Skip Barber Racing School. She took immediately to the upgraded complexity, and speed, of a vehicle that had a clutch and could do 120 miles per hour, and the next year, at 14, she became the first female champion in the 31-year history of the Skip Barber Series, a launchpad for professional racers.

As is the case with all child racers, Landauer’s expensive hobby was funded by her parents, a doctor and a lawyer who got all three of their kids into go-karts because, her father decided, racing was one of only three sports that allowed boys and girls to truly compete on equal footing (archery and sky diving being the others). “The goal was just to get them to take responsibility, to get used to functioning under a little bit of pressure, and to have fun,” says Steve Landauer (he’s the doctor). The Landauers also liked that racing taught their girls to “not succumb to a lot of the social norms about stepping out of the way,” adds Tracy, her mom.

But the Landauers had no idea how talented their oldest child would be until she started winning races—and then didn’t stop. Even before Julia won the Skip Barber Series, she had decided she was going to be a professional driver someday. “By the time I was 12, I was like, ‘I could do this forever,’ ” she says.

And that posed a problem: If Julia really did stick with it, becoming a pro racer was likely to take years and cost tens and perhaps hundreds of thousands of dollars just to get to a point where she might start earning money. The Landauers were happy to support their daughter and would keep contributing to the best of their ability, but they weren’t about to go broke doing it. So they began an open dialogue that put some of the onus on her. If Julia wanted to keep racing, she’d eventually have to figure out a way to supplement the costs.

Read the full article.

Eight Eco-Friendly Communities for Golfers

Save On Energy
By Shelly White

If you’re a golf enthusiast, you’ve probably been watching the PGA Tour and eyeing the lush landscapes – wishing you could play on similar courses. We’ve got you covered. Our SaveOnEnergy.com® analysts looked at golf courses around the country to find some of the best spots to putt.

To make the cut, the course needed to be GEO Certified® – an award given to courses by the Golf Environment Organization that meet certain standards in the areas of nature, energy, supply chain and pollution control. Next, every golf course we chose to feature is in a town that has a high recorded number of sunshine days each year and a good overall air quality rating from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), making it a great place to visit. Ready to take your game to a new fairway? Check out the list we compiled below.

Credit: Visit Laguna Beach

Credit: Visit Laguna Beach

Ben Brown’s Golf Course at the Ranch at Laguna Beach
A course located in Southern California is the first on our list: Ben Brown’s Golf Courseat the Ranch at Laguna Beach. Not only is it a gorgeous golf course, it’s also a friend to the environment. Ben Brown’s works with two organizations – the California Coastal Commission and the Laguna Canyon Foundation (LGF). Partnering with the first, the golf course monitors the chemical, biological and visual quality of its nearby water weekly. With help from the LGF, it stays on top of the air quality in the surrounding environment.

Read more about this course.

Broken Sound Club
We head to the southeastern corner of our country for the next course. In Boca Raton, FL, the Broken Sound Club golf course is making strides to maintain a high level of eco-friendliness. Broken Sound was the second golf course in the United States and the 14th in world to become GEO Certified.

Read more about this course.

Old South Golf Links
Just across the bridge from Hilton Head Island, SC, lies Bluffton – and the Old South Golf Links course. A GEO Certified course since 2016, Old South takes care to prevent contaminants from entering the water table.

Read more about this course.

PGA National Resort and Spa
This South Florida golf course has maintained its GEO Certification since 2015. Located in the affluent city of Palm Beach Gardens, the PGA National Resort and Spa has made significant efforts to reduce its energy usage. With the initiatives it has in place – such as using energy-efficient irrigation pumps – the golf course has saved an estimated $18,000 each year in energy costs.

Read more about this course.

Read more about all of the eco-friendly rated courses, including:
The Bear Trace at Harri
The Legends at Parris Islandson Bay
The Sea Pines Resort
The Venice Golf and Country Club

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